Berlin Kreuzberg: development and life in the district

Hardly any other neighborhood today is more representative of Berlin's vibrant life away from the tourist center. In Kreuzberg, workers meet alternatives and old Berliners meet generations of migrants. Students, artists, night owls, young families and a large Turkish community make Kreuzberg what it is: a lively and colorful trendy neighborhood with all the advantages of urban life. In the following chapters, we will show you what exactly makes Kreuzberg so fascinating and, of course, we have also compiled a few meaningful facts for you here.

Real Estate Market in Berlin Kreuzberg

The real estate market is booming in the capital: Prices for condominiums and houses have more than doubled in the past few years, and rents have developed in a similar way. Due to the high attractiveness of the district, this trend can also be observed in Kreuzberg and an end to this development is not in sight. The international and young population is increasingly entering the scene as a financially strong buyer class, thus contributing to the positive trend in value development. On the other hand, there is limited space for new developments and low fluctuation in the existing segment. This means that demand is high and supply rather low, which, as is well known, creates huge interest in, and extreme upward price pressure on, sought-after and rare properties.

Existing buildings

Average rental prices

15

EUR / m²

+5.10%

Average purchase prices

5,788

EUR / m²

+8.85%

Rental offers

256

-26.05%

Purchase offers

766

-24.05%

New builds

Average rental prices

20.04

EUR / m²

+5.09%

Average purchase prices

8,999

EUR / m²

+13.41%

Rental offers

77

-38.72%

Purchase offers

90

+0.56%

Average rental prices

15

EUR / m²

+5.10%

Average purchase prices

5,788

EUR / m²

+8.85%

Rental offers

256

-26.05%

Purchase offers

766

-24.05%

Average rental prices

20.04

EUR / m²

+5.09%

Average purchase prices

8,999

EUR / m²

+13.41%

Rental offers

77

-38.72%

Purchase offers

90

+0.56%

Kreuzberg: Real estate supply and development

The supply of real estate in Kreuzberg is rare and has even declined further in recent years. The district's real estate market, which is dominated by older buildings, is unlikely to see any serious changes in the medium term. There have never been so few offers to buy as at present in any other of the past few years.

Offer of properties for rent and sale in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg

Rental offers
Purchase offers

How are property prices developing in Kreuzberg?

As in the other districts of Berlin, property prices have risen steadily in recent years. At present, it can be assumed that this trend will continue, which simply speaks for the high attractiveness of the location.

Purchase price (m²) in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg

Existing building

Average purchase prices

5,788

EUR / m²

+8.85%

New builds

Average purchase prices

8,999

EUR / m²

+13.41%

Average purchase price Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg

New build
Existing building

Current rents and development

The attractive district in the heart of Berlin attracts many people, so demand for rental apartments is correspondingly high. At the same time, young professional tenants are willing to pay high prices per square meter - and the trend is upward. With the end of the rent cap, it can also be assumed in the medium term that rents for existing properties will once again converge with those for new buildings.

Average rental prices in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg

Existing building

Average purchase prices

5,788

EUR / m²

+8.85%

New builds

Average purchase prices

8,999

EUR / m²

+13.41%

The population in Kreuzberg

The people of Kreuzberg appreciate and love their immigrant district, as lively, colorful and loud as it is. The community of Turkish origin is large and forms an integral part oft he district - although many of them have long since become original Kreuzbergers themselves, living here in the third or fourth generation. The history of migration began after the construction of the Berlin Wall: large industrial companies such as AEG or Siemens attracted tens of thousands of "guest workers" until the 1970s - most of them from Turkey as well as a smaller part from the former Yugoslavia. Today, the public as a whole is even broader and more international, both culturally and socially.

If you want to, you can always find something to do in Kreuzberg - and until late at night, because nowhere else in the capital is the density of bars and clubs as high as here. It is therefore all the more remarkable that the district has nevertheless been able to retain its familiar flair and a neighborly feeling of togetherness. The many night owls from the surrounding neighborhoods are welcome, but as in so many districts, if you don't live here but just drop in to party, you're not quite part of the Kreuzberg family in the end. And it is as multicultural as it is young. According to statistics, at around 38 years of age, Kreuzbergers are almost four years younger than the average Berliner.

Residents Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg
The five largest international populations in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg

Migration in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg

Moves in

16,400

Persons

--1.76 %

Moves out

13,876

Persons

--4.47 %

In the year 2021, development compared to the previous year

Life in Berlin Kreuzberg

Students, artists, night owls, young families and a large Turkish community make Kreuzberg what it is: a lively trendy district with many cafés, original stores, parks and beautiful walking and biking paths along the Spree River or the Landwehr Canal. Hardly any other district today stands more for the bustling Berlin life away from the tourist center. In Kreuzberg, workers meet alternatives and old Berliners meet generations of migrants. A historical highlight is certainly Checkpoint Charlie, which was one of the most important border crossings between East and West during the Wall era. But the German Museum of Technology and the East Side Gallery in nearby Friedrichshain also ensure that residents and tourists alike flock to Kreuzberg.

A stroll through Kreuzberg's streets almost inevitably begins with a visit to one of the many Turkish cafés, which often still bake their own food and thus offer the best original baklava. But anyway, thanks to a diverse gastronomic scene, culinary enthusiasts in Kreuzberg get their money's worth everywhere - from a quick kebab at a snack stand to fine wine in a stylish bar. In Kreuzberg, life likes to take place on the street: At the greengrocer's stall, on the picnic blanket in Görlitzer Park or on the street corner at a stand-up poetry slam. Nightlife also has a lot to offer: Clubs and bars were allowed to stay open until the wee hours of the morning, at least before Corona - without a curfew and in keeping with the motto of the '70s crowd-pleaser "Kreuzberg nights are long."

Kreuzberg is a district in the borough of Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg - the only district besides Mitte that consists of parts of former East and West Berlin. Named after the 66-meter-high Kreuzberg in Viktoriapark, Berlin's smallest district is one of the most densely populated in the nation's capital.

Kreuzberg and Friedrichshain are separated by the Spree River. The river, which once marked the border of two states, is now a connecting waterway with an idyllic feel. At the same time, the imposing and historic Oberbaum Bridge invites visitors to stroll, linger and enjoy the view. Today an important connection for car and subway traffic, in GDR times the bridge was a "border crossing point" passable only for pedestrians.

Kreuzberg benefited particularly from reunification: the district was suddenly no longer on the border, but centrally located in the city. For this reason, many Berliners today see the true heart of their city beating in Kreuzberg. In fact, the geographic center of the city is also located here - a tiny granite slab near the sports field on Lobeckstraße points this out.

Kreuzberg's central location also makes it the perfect starting point for further city explorations in all directions. Neighboring districts to the north are Mitte as well as Pankow, and the officially annexed Friedrichshain to the east. To the south are Neukölln and Tempelhof, and Schöneberg and Tiergarten to the west.

Kreuzberg neighborhoods

Of course, not all Kreuzberg is the same. Many neighborhoods have their own charm, most of them more than a little, a few exceptions perhaps a little less. The southern part, called "Kreuzberg 61" after the old postal delivery districts, is considered more bourgeois and dignified. Here you can find the lively Bergmannskiez with many small stores, restaurants and cafés.

The heart of the district is Marheinekeplatz, a popular meeting place for the many young families who appreciate Kreuzberg as a lively yet familiar place to live. Not far from here, Chamissoplatz delights with magnificent buildings from the Gründerzeit. Every Saturday, one of the largest and oldest eco-markets in Berlin takes place here.

This part of Kreuzberg is also home to a real architectural gem: "Riehmers Hofgarten" is one of Berlin's most sophisticated residential properties. Lavishly renovated, the historic ensemble, which is more than 100 years old, presents itself with spacious old apartments and penthouses as well as its own magnificent courtyard garden. A look through the gate is worthwhile in any case!

The eastern part of Kreuzberg, known as "SO 36," is also full of life: At Kottbusser Tor, young revelers and hipsters meet old-timers and newcomers. The "Kotti" is a dynamic hub that shows the entire spectrum of the big city - to this day it has remained a social hotspot that brings out not only the beautiful sides of Berlin, but the bad sides too. The situation is similar in the area around Görlitzer Park and the Schlesisches Tor subway station, undoubtedly criminal hotspots of the city. And yet - and this is typical Kreuzberg - the "Görli" with its extensive sunbathing areas and sports fields is also a popular destination.

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The Graefekiez also offers stark contrasts: While social housing still dominates in the south, the northern part is characterized by beautifully renovated apartments in old buildings, a lively restaurant scene and nightlife. Lots of water and greenery make the Graefekiez particularly attractive - not least because it is one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city. Another popular residential area is the Paul-Lincke Ufer on the Landwehrkanal. Those who live here enjoy an environment with excellent gastronomy and a wide range of cultural offerings.

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Northwest Kreuzberg, with Südlicher Friedrichstadt, Mehringplatz and Askanischer Platz, is dominated by offices and commercial space as well as social housing.

Kreuzberg has retained its charm as a residential and trendy neighborhood - large companies tend to be located in the immediate vicinity, in Friedrichshain. But of course people also work in Kreuzberg: The creative scene is represented by numerous agencies, coworking spaces and studios. Especially around Moritzplatz, an innovative and dynamic start-up scene has emerged in recent years, from which well-known Internet brands such as amorelie have sprung. The central location in the immediate vicinity of the government district in Berlin Mitte and the young, international population also contribute to the attractiveness of Kreuzberg as a business location.

It never gets boring in Kreuzberg - and not only because of the nightlife. The list of sights, historical places and cultural highlights is long, the choice is huge. An absolute must for everyone is of course the famous border crossing Checkpoint Charlie, symbol of the East-West conflict and today one of the most important landmarks of the city. Right here in 1961 Soviet Russia and the United States faced each other with tanks.

The Jewish Museum Berlin continues in a historical vein. The largest Jewish museum in Europe provides deep insights into Jewish culture and not least the moving German-Jewish history.

Not far away is the Gropius Bau with regularly changing exhibitions of international standing. Art treasures since the late 19th century are on display in the Berlinische Galerie. And the German Museum of Technology offers insights into the cultural history of technical achievements - from hot air balloons to computers - on more than 26,000 square meters.

For those who need a break in between such a concentrated cultural program, Kreuzberg offers numerous oases of tranquility by the water and in the countryside, for example on the Landwehrkanal promenade or in Viktoriapark. The park not only has a famous national monument commemorating the victory over Napoleon to offer, but even an impressive waterfall where you can swim in the summer.

Those who love culinary journeys of discovery will get their money's worth in Kreuzberg. The selection of international cuisine is inspiring. And even if Turkish gastronomy is particularly well represented - Kreuzberg has much more to offer. Whether Arabic, Vietnamese, Korean or Italian - the spectrum ranges not only around the world, but also from simple street food to exquisite posh addresses.

According to the motto "Eating differently" and "Shopping differently," the historic Markthalle Neun on Eisenbahnstraße primarily offers fresh seasonal and regional products. The street food market, on-site cooking classes, a glass bakery and butcher shop, and an open canteen ensure that no one has to leave Markthalle Neun hungry.

To continue the evening program after dinner, there are many small bars, Spätis and clubs to choose from on Oranienstrasse, for example. Here night owls celebrate the energetic and diverse Berlin lifestyle, for which Kreuzberg stands like no other district.

The best-known and most popular clubs include SO36 (named after the old Berlin postal delivery district Süd Ost 36), Watergate and Prince Charles. But from Kreuzberg it is also not far to possibly the most famous techno club in the world. We are talking, of course, about the famous Berghain in neighboring Friedrichshain. On the grounds of the old Ostbahnhof, there is room for around 1500 people for exuberant parties.

Kreuzberg is a great place to stroll and shop - and much more relaxed and quiet than the shopping hotspots in Berlin-Mitte. Bergmannstrasse in particular offers a wide range of fashion from elegant to cool. Trendy vintage boutiques alternate with charming small stores for furniture and home accessories. From vegan fashion to home-brewed spirits, from homemade chocolates to records: there is always a new hip store opening somewhere in the neighborhood that is worth discovering. Kreuzberg is also considered a center for sustainable consumption. In addition to the large eco-market that takes place every Saturday on Chamissoplatz, the "Original Unverpackt" is the first supermarket in Berlin to offer shopping entirely without disposable packaging.

Berlin Kreuzberg is a popular residential district that also has a lot to offer families with children. Compared to other parts of the city, the density of schools and daycare centers is the highest here, which allows children and parents short distances and good childcare options. There are three high schools in Kreuzberg alone. The private universities located here also offer students a wide range of options for further education and enrich the educational opportunities in the district. In addition, there are two swimming pools, several cinemas and small theaters in the district. Kreuzberg is home to the Vivantes Klinikum, one of Berlin's nine hospitals. It has almost 600 beds and is an emergency hospital and teaching hospital of the Berlin University Medical Center.

Kreuzberg is the most central district of Berlin and is easily accessible by public transportation. U1, U6, U7 and U8 run through the district, as do S1 and S2. The famous U1/U3 subway line connects Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg with City West and Kurfürstendamm. It runs from the Warschauer Straße subway station through Kreuzberg to Charlottenburg. The eastern section runs as an elevated line and is the oldest section of Berlin's subway network. Connections to local and long-distance transportation are provided by Ostbahnhof (Berlin's third-largest train station), as well as Ostkreuz station, which is not far from Friedrichshain and is used daily by 100,000 people as a transfer station.

The district can also be explored - and enjoyed - by bicycle. In 2020 alone, Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg has designated 14 kilometers of new bike paths, including so-called pop-up bike paths, such as along the Landwehr Canal. For this, the district was awarded the German Bicycle Prize. Routes through the Wrangelkiez to Eisenbahnstrasse or along Oranienstrasse with its beautiful Berlin backyards in the direction of the mobile Prinzessinnengärten at Moritzplatz invite you to take a bike tour. It is also a real experience to cross the imposing Oberbaumbrücke towards Friedrichshain, once a border crossing between East and West, by bike.

Is Kreuzberg located in the former GDR? No, part of the former East Berlin and thus of the German Democratic Republic was the Friedrichshain district, which now officially belongs to it.

What are the top sights in Kreuzberg? Checkpoint Charlie, Jewish Museum, Viktoriapark, Markthalle Neun, Bergmannstraße, Riehmers Hofgarten, Osterbaumbrücke (link to relevant related pages, external).

How safe is it in Kreuzberg? Those who like it less wild are best off in Lichtenberg, Marzahn-Hellersdorf or even Steglitz-Zehlendorf. In terms of the number of crimes committed, Kreuzberg is indeed clearly in the upper range compared to other Berlin districts, but many crimes are concentrated in particular in individual districts and clearly definable areas. On the other hand, people from Kreuzberg who were interviewed as part of a survey were rather positive about the perceived safety in the district.

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