Berlin Charlottenburg: development and life in the district

Charlottenburg is the fine address in the old west of Berlin. Here you can stroll along the Ku'damm, the world-famous shopping mile, enjoy beautiful residential buildings from the Wilhelminian period or indulge in the many cultural offerings to your heart's content. Charlottenburg is a paradise for art and culture lovers, and families feel very comfortable in the quiet and child-friendly neighborhood. The residential buildings, cafés and restaurants in beautiful buildings from the Gründerzeit in green and charming side streets can already make you go into raptures.

Real Estate Market in Berlin Charlottenburg

The real estate market is booming in the capital and the run on the offered properties is unbroken. Charlottenburg is one of the most desirable places to live in the metropolis and also one of the most expensive. On the other hand, there is a very well-off group of buyers with a high demand for the sometimes very luxurious properties. Particularly in demand in Charlottenburg are the imposing and well-kept old buildings in charming surroundings.

Existing buildings

Average rental prices

14

EUR / m²

+8.54%

Average purchase prices

6,018

EUR / m²

+7.11%

Rental offers

499

-14.60%

Purchase offers

1,322

-18.42%

New builds

Average rental prices

20.11

EUR / m²

+7.97%

Average purchase prices

10,739

EUR / m²

+25.83%

Rental offers

155

-18.74%

Purchase offers

180

-30.56%

Average rental prices

14

EUR / m²

+8.54%

Average purchase prices

6,018

EUR / m²

+7.11%

Rental offers

499

-14.60%

Purchase offers

1,322

-18.42%

Average rental prices

20.11

EUR / m²

+7.97%

Average purchase prices

10,739

EUR / m²

+25.83%

Rental offers

155

-18.74%

Purchase offers

180

-30.56%

Charlottenburg: Real estate supply and development

In elegant Charlottenburg, equally elegant properties dominate the surrounding area. Depending on the location within Charlottenburg, stylish old buildings alternate with exclusive villas and upscale single-family homes. In addition, there are also typical post-war housing estates and, on the other hand, many ultra-modern new construction projects.

Offer of properties for rent and sale in Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf

Rental offers
Purchase offers

How are real estate prices developing in Charlottenburg?

Real estate prices in Charlottenburg are expected to continue to develop as they have in the past. The supply of existing apartments has declined in recent years, while demand from financially strong prospective buyers is high. Declining property prices for the district are therefore not to be expected.

Purchase price (m²) in Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf

Existing building

Average purchase prices

6,018

EUR / m²

+7.11%

New builds

Average purchase prices

10,739

EUR / m²

+25.83%

Average purchase price Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf

New build
Existing building

Current rents and trends

Rents in Charlottenburg have continued to rise in recent years. Due to the high demand from prospective tenants for Charlottenburg real estate, there is no end in sight to this trend.

Average rental prices in Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf

Existing building

Average purchase prices

6,018

EUR / m²

+7.11%

New builds

Average purchase prices

10,739

EUR / m²

+25.83%

The population of Charlottenburg

Around 180,000 people live in Charlottenburg, half of whom are older than 45. Incomes are correspondingly high: A large proportion of Charlottenburg residents earn more than 2,600 euros net per month. Overall, the population is somewhat more homogeneous than in other central districts. More middle-class, upscale, not so multicultural and colorful - this is how the population of the district can be described.

Residents Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf
The five largest international populations in Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf

Migration in Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf

Moves in

18,181

Persons

+6.93 %

Moves out

22,545

Persons

+31.49 %

In the year 2021, development compared to the previous year

Living in Berlin Charlottenburg

Welcome to Berlin's finest address, welcome to Charlottenburg! In the following lines we will take you to the old west of Berlin: Here you can stroll along the Ku'damm, the world-famous shopping mile, you can enjoy beautiful houses from the Wilhelminian period or you can indulge in the many cultural activities. Until 1920 Charlottenburg was its own city and somehow this independence has been preserved. Even today, the district is like an island in the midst of Berlin's other trendy and hip neighborhoods. The people of Charlottenburg themselves swear by their district. They appreciate the fact that it is chic and sophisticated, but also relaxed, casual and unagitated. Charlottenburg is a paradise for art and culture lovers, and families feel very comfortable in the quiet and child-friendly neighborhood. The residential buildings, cafés and restaurants in beautiful buildings from the Wilhelminian period in green and charming side streets can make you go into raptures. Charlottenburg may not be as hip and trendy as Kreuzberg, Mitte and co, but if you are looking for a relaxed and historic place with urban flair, this is the place to be.

Charlottenburg is located in the central-western part of Berlin, bordering Spandau to the west, Reinickendorf to the north, Mitte and Tempelhof to the east, and Steglitz-Zehlendorf to the south. Charlottenburg is divided into the neighborhoods North, Northwest, Southeast and Westend, with Westend being one of the most distinguished villa neighborhoods of Berlin.

Berliners hold their neighborhoods sacred, and Charlottenburg can be said to consist of a single collection of neighborhoods. Here we give you a brief overview of what characterizes the different neighborhoods:

The Klausenerkiez used to be home to working-class families, and later on its residents were known for resisting authorities and being basically committed to their neighborhood. Today, there is no longer any talk of resistance, but the residents are already very fond of the neighborhood and rarely leave their area. The neighborhood is characterized by beautiful old buildings. A walk through the streets is worthwhile just because of this magnificent architecture. You should also pay a visit to the Klausnerkiez supermarket. This was built in 1900 as a riding hall, was then used as a church, later as a cinema and from the 1970s as a supermarket. Even today, paintings rediscovered during renovation work bear witness to its use as a church.

Those who long for recreation should pay a visit to the Lietzenseekiez. It is not only the people of Charlottenburg who appreciate the beautiful lake and the adjacent park for walks or extensive sunbathing.

The Eichkampkiez (also called Eichkampsiedlung) can be described as a small village in the middle of the big city. Residential development in the form of terraced and semi-detached houses and a lot of green dominate when you stroll through this neighborhood. Despite the rather quiet and rural surroundings, you can quickly reach other parts of Berlin because of the good transport connections.

Even more recreational character offers the Jungfernheide, which with forest area, park, lakes, adventure playground and climbing garden for the whole family entertainment ready. A small sight within Jungfernheide is a 19th century water tower, which can be viewed from the surrounding beer garden.

At Savignyplatz, you can shop and relax in one of the cozy cafes or feast in various restaurants. Even beyond Charlottenburg's borders, Savignyplatz is a tip for relaxed shopping.

The Wilmersdorferkiez is home to Wilmersdorfer Straße, a well and gladly visited shopping street. There are well-known retail chains here, but also traditional and smaller stores. The architectural mix is interesting here, with modern buildings alternating with beautiful old buildings. By the way, the oldest house on Wilmersdorfer Straße is a one-story house from 1720.

Everyone who enjoys beautiful and elegant houses and villas should visit Westend. Here it is quiet and well-kept, but the neighborhood is not only Schicki-Micki, but it has now developed a good mix of academics, families and young people. Insider tip: Depending on the wind direction, you can probably listen to the concerts from the Olympic Stadium from here.

The area around Ku'damm and Breitscheidplatz is known as the Zoo-Kiez. Here life pulsates with theaters, sights and shopping opportunities, which we have presented to you in several places in our district portrait. The Kiez also includes the train station and the zoo, which practically represent the central area of Charlottenburg.

Charlottenburg can be described as an attractive business location. Location advantages include the proximity to the trade fair, broadcasting, the Olympic Stadium and numerous theaters. The resident companies are diverse in their orientation, with industry examples such as tourism, retail, culture or services. Charlottenburg is not an industrial district, yet there are commercial areas and commercial properties that are attractive for production and warehousing.

When it comes to sights and history, Charlottenburg has quite a lot of interesting things to offer. Let's perhaps start with the Zoological Garden, which is centrally located across from Zoo Station. It is the most species-rich and also the oldest zoo in Germany - it was opened in 1844 and is therefore already over 180 years old.

Messe Berlin has always hosted the IFA, the International Consumer Electronics Fair, and is therefore world famous. Already in 1924 there was the first radio exhibition, which makes it therefore one of the oldest fairs in Germany.

A landmark of Charlottenburg and also of the former West Berlin is the radio tower, which is also called "Langer Lulatsch" because of its height of almost 150 meters. Historical highlight: In 1935, the first regular television program was broadcast over the radio tower. And speaking of broadcasting: The rbb (Rundfunk Berlin-Brandenburg) is headquartered in the Haus des Rundfunks, directly across from the exhibition grounds on Masurenallee. The building was inaugurated in the early 1930s and still carries some of the flair of that time.

The soccer fans among you have probably been waiting all along for the sight that now follows: the Olympic Stadium. This is the home of the Bundesliga team Hertha BSC. By the way, did you know how the capital club is said to have got its name? Fritz Lindner, co-founder of the club, is said to have taken a steamboat trip on the "Hertha" and probably liked it so much that he named his club after it.

Also on the grounds of the Olympic Stadium is the Olympiabad, which was built for the 1936 Olympic Games. Here you can swim and train to your heart's content.

Why is Charlottenburg actually called Charlottenburg? We will now answer this question with the help of our last sight. Around 1700, a summer residence of manageable size was built for Electress Charlotte, and it was from the same that the place got its name. However, the residence had nothing to do with a magnificent castle. It only became one in the following centuries, when changing monarchs expanded the estate according to their wishes. Today, Charlottenburg Palace is a real tourist magnet, especially for international visitors. Next to the palace, next to the Orangery, is one of Charlottenburg's most beautiful green spaces. The baroque garden design has been preserved until today and is therefore the oldest garden complex in Berlin that has been preserved in its original form.

At the beginning we mentioned that Charlottenburg is a paradise for theater and musical theater fans, and in this section we would like to tell you what exactly we mean by that and why that is really the case. We'll start with the Deutsche Oper Berlin. The house opened in 1912, was destroyed during the war, then rebuilt and reopened in 1961. Since then, it has been Berlin's largest and Germany's second-largest music theater with ultra-modern equipment. It likes to play lesser-known pieces and also focuses on world premieres.

If you want something smaller, more intimate, the Renaissance Theater on Knesebeckstraße is the right choice. The name is somewhat misleading, however, as the building is one of the few remaining Art Deco theaters in Europe. When you enter the theater, you are immediately enchanted by its special architecture and you have a bit of a feeling as if actors like Harald Juhnke, Maximilian Schell and Hildegard Knef left some of their special magic behind when they played on this stage.

If you're now in the mood for some lighter entertainment, you should definitely stop by the Komödie am Kurfürstendamm. Here, guests can expect comedies, boulevard plays, shows and concerts. What makes it special: The Komödie am Kurfürstendamm is currently not located on Kurfürstendamm at all, but has temporarily moved into the no less traditional Schillertheater on Bismarckstraße. The former legendary Ku'damm Karree will become the FÜRST, where the comedy will return to its original location after completion.

And for all moviegoers, of course, the Zoo-Palast must not go unmentioned. This house has been an institution among cineastes since its opening in 1919 (when it was still called Ufa-Palast am Zoo) and is famous for its premieres. Metropolis in 1927, The Tiger of Esschnapur in 1938 or Münchhausen in 1934; all these titles have written German film history. After a three-year renovation phase, "the most beautiful cinema in the city" has once again been the venue for the Berlin Film Festival since 2014 and is also a premiere cinema.

So much theater talk making you hungry and thirsty? Then it's time for our gastronomic tips. Charlottenburg is considered to be fashionable and chic, a stronghold of fashion and so on. But what we present to you as our first gastronomic tip has nothing at all to do with glamorous: It's all about the sausage! To be more precise, it's about the most legendary curry sausage in Berlin, and some people claim it's the best in the capital. We're talking, of course, about "Curry 36," the Berlin snack bar that has been frying sausage after sausage at Mehringdamm 36 in Kreuzberg since 1980 and opened its first branch at Hardenbergplatz near Bahnhof Zoo in 2012. Since then, you can also enjoy the cult sausage in Charlottenburg after a short walk. By the way, the Currywurst was invented in Charlottenburg - by Herta Heuwer on Kaiser-Friedrich-Strasse in 1949!

Of course, in a district like Charlottenburg there is not only currywurst, but a varied gastronomy for every taste from high end chic to down-to-earth eateries. And for fans of upscale cuisine, there are of course one or two (or 100!) fine dining restaurants. By the way, the very first Chinese restaurant in Germany, the "Tsientsin", was opened on Kantstraße in 1923.

Shopping

If you want to talk about shopping in Berlin in general and in Charlottenburg in particular, there is one name you simply can't avoid: the Kurfürstendamm or - and this is the common name - the Ku'damm. On and next to the 3.5 kilometer long legendary shopping street, there are shopping opportunities as far as the eye can see. From big fashion chains to luxury labels, all the well-known names are represented. But also smaller traditional stores; bookstores, decoration stores and much more make the hearts of shopping fans beat faster. You should also definitely make a detour to the Bikini House. The building from the 50s has turned into a scene shopping mall, where it is younger and hipper than you would expect in Charlottenburg. Here you can stroll to live jazz music through unusual stores away from the big chain stores. It is also worth mentioning that Charlottenburg is not only a shopper's paradise, but that many designers and creatives from the field have also settled here. So it's also worth keeping your eyes open for appropriate studios and young labels.

If we write about Ku'damm here, you might also expect us to write about KADEWE, the Kaufhaus des Westens, but this is no longer in Charlottenburg, but already belongs to Schöneberg. Maybe also interesting: The Tour de France started on the Kurfürstendamm in 1987.

If we write about Ku'damm here, you might also expect us to write about KaDeWe, the Kaufhaus des Westens, but this is no longer in Charlottenburg, but already belongs to Schöneberg. Maybe also interesting: The Tour de France started on the Kurfürstendamm in 1987.

Charlottenburg has an excellent infrastructure. Here you can find doctors, schools, supermarkets and all other offers of daily needs for all requirements and individual needs. The Technical University of Berlin is located in Charlottenburg and is one of the twenty largest universities in Germany with around 35,000 students and a range of over one hundred courses of study. There are also several hospitals in Charlottenburg, including the Schlosspark-Klinik and the Malteser Krankenhaus.

Perhaps the most famous German train station is located in Charlottenburg. The "Bahnhof Zoo" came to general fame in the 80s through the movie "Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo", but not in a positive sense. Perhaps some of you still remembers that this film was part of the compulsory program in schools when it came to the subject of drug education. Today, the station is still frequented by drug addicts and sadly the homeless, but it is nowhere near as dangerous as it was in earlier decades. It has been undergoing extensive renovation for several years and is therefore developing away from its old grubby image. 100,000 people use the station daily as a transfer point between S-Bahn, U-Bahn and regional trains.

Otherwise, Charlottenburg offers all the advantages of a big city in terms of mobility. From Zoo station, you can take several S-Bahn trains to the main train station in 9 minutes, and in about 20 minutes you can either get to bustling Kreuzberg by bus or subway or be at Alexanderplatz in Mitte.

Why is Charlottenburg also called Charlottengrad?

Many Russians settled in Charlottenburg in the 1920s, fleeing the civil war in Russia that began in 1917. Subsequently, many Russian pubs, cinemas, theaters, bookstores, stores and publishing houses were established, so that the name "Charlottengrad" became established. Well-known Russian artists also felt at home in the district. Even today, Charlottenburg is popular with Russian residents of the capital - about 17,000 live here. By the way, the oldest Russian restaurant in Berlin, the "Samowar", is located at Charlottenburg Palace.

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